Monthly Archives: February 2013

Keeping LinkedIn fresh for discoverability and SEO

Its important to update your LinkedIn profile often, but how often?

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A recent poll on Smart blogs indicated that less than half of LinkedIn users update their profiles more than once a year:

    • I do it more than once a year: 47.12%
    • I do it once a year or less: 36.09%
    • I don’t have a LinkedIn profile: 8.02%
    • I don’t revise my profile: 7.52%
    • Not sure: 1.25%

You do not even need to directly update your profile to get noticed by SEO spiders. Something as simple as updating your status will do. This announces to the search engines that your LinkedIn profile page is active and should be re-indexed by the search engines.

Any type of status update will do. Traditional update, sharing a link, commenting on another person’s status update. All of these activities places an incremental flag on the database entry that contains your profile and announces to the web crawlers to index your entry.

So keep LinkedIn fresh. Use it for profile management, connection management and to reach out to new people. LinkedIn is a fantastic CRM tool – but many of the little known features of LinkedIn are the ones that will help you work your connections the most..

Look out for a future post on using LinkedIn as a CRM tool and really enhance how you use it.

Eileen is a social media strategist and consultant at Amastra, a columnist at ZDNet and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact Eileen to find out how she can elevate your brand and help your business become more social.

Image credit: Knutux

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Who owns your content?

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You don’t own your Twitter updates, you do not own your Facebook updates. If you have a wordpress.com blog, then as soon as you hit publish the content belongs to WordPress. Read the terms and conditions on your own social platform. As soon as you upload the content is no longer yours.

Although these words have come out of my brain, through my fingertips, as soon as I hit publish on this blog, it belongs to WordPress, or on my Social Business blog then ZDNet owns the content.

You own the content on Facebook. However you give Facebook the following rights:

“For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

When you publish content or information using the Public setting, it means that you are allowing everyone, including people off of Facebook, to access and use that information, and to associate it with you (i.e., your name and profile picture)”.

Your content is also yours on Twitter but you:

“Grant us a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license (with the right to sublicense) to use, copy, reproduce, process, adapt, modify, publish, transmit, display and distribute such Content in any and all media or distribution methods (now known or later developed)”.

Twitter and Facebook use the information that you have freely submitted. They analyse your behaviour, work out how they can best use this social data gold mine of information. Twitter has been selling access to your Tweets for some time now. Customers pay for this data to work out how best to market to you on social media and influence your buying decisions.

You do not even own your online profile on social media platforms either. You give information away hoping that the knowledge you have shared will enhance someone else’s day.

Just like this blog entry really…

Eileen is a social media strategist and consultant at Amastra, a columnist at ZDNet and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact Eileen to find out how she can elevate your brand and help your business become more social.

Image Credit: Aturkus

Does social media influence your buying decisions?

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You see a tweet. You buy the product. True or False?

False of course. We are not so easily influenced by promoted pages and promoted tweets.  These promotions are just to make us aware of the product.  Then we will decide.

But how many of us would actually buy just based on social media messages alone?

Forrester has done some research showing that less than 1 per cent of sales actually come from social channels. It watched 77,000 consumer orders placed during April 2012 and discovered that:

Although 33 per cent of transactions by new customers involve more than one trackable touch point, 48% of repeat customers visit multiple trackable touch points.  These touch points include searches for the product, pay per click advertising placements onto websites email blasts and newsletters.

Email is important for return business.  If the brand starts the interaction with an existing customer it is likely to turn into a sale. Thirty per cent of sales transactions come from existing customers that have received an email from the retailer. An additional 30 per cent of customers type the retailer’s URL directly into a browser.

Forty-eight per cent of consumers reported that social media posts are a great way to become aware of new products. however less than one per cent of transactions could be traced back to trackable links on social media sites.This indicates that Social tactics are not meaningful sales drivers but are valuable for awareness.

If there are trackable links such as bit.ly and a great analytics engine behind the web site, then social links can be directly linked to sales. But without these processes in place, then the brand needs to focus on awareness and remaining top of mind in its social channels whilst closing sales through other forms of digital marketing, complemented by social feeds.

It is such a shame that many brands still get this wrong…

Eileen is a social media strategist and consultant at Amastra, a columnist at ZDNet and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact Eileen to find out how she can elevate your brand and help your business become more social.

Image credit: Tom Morris