Monthly Archives: April 2012

Air New Zealand putting challenge at 30,000ft

Are you bored when you fly long distance on planes?  Have a look at the latest promotion from Air New Zealand. 

It sponsored the PGA Pro-Am tournament and held a putting challenge whilst in the air.

As the plane flies nose up, you will need to know how to putt down hill, and I’m sure there were other challenges of getting the ball exactly down the aisle out of the way of feet, cushions, blankets  and bags.

The leaders seemed to deliver the putt quite a distance, achieving 23ft whilst in the air on 23rd and 24th March. Air New Zealand claimed that this promotion was the first of its kind.  It is probably right too.

But it’ not the only innovative idea that the marketing team have come up with. It surprised 60 diners in Melbourne with free flight tickets in November.

A great publicity generating idea for the brand Smile

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

Advertisements

Google’s patent filing gives us ultra targeted ads

Google has filed a patent giving it an insight to where we are when we use our mobile phones. 

Ear we go: Adverts could soon be produced according to environmental conditions such as background noise, if Google's patent becomes reality

According to the Mail, this technology could glean information from the background sounds in your environment and use this to deliver more targeted advertising to you

The patent ‘describes using ‘temperature, humidity, light and air composition’ to produced targeted adverts’.  There are some huge possibilities here for advertisers if Google decides to go ahead and develop a sensor from this…

One one hand this could really benefit consumers.  They get ultra targeted ads, relevant to the time of day, weather, humidity, or local conditions.  It could be an ad mans dream.  But there could be other, less desirable outcomes…

According to Ofcom, 22 per cent of adults and 47 per cent of teenagers use our phones in the bathroom. Goodness only knows what sort of ads Google would be sending us based on the data it gathers there…

Certainly one to watch – when – or if it ever makes it off the drawing (patent) board…

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

Technorati Tags: ,,

Fifteen ways to amuse yourself when phone spammers call

image

 

I seem to get more and more unsolicited phone calls nowadays.  In addition to the regular calls telling me I have a virus or malware on my PC, I’m getting more and more calls I don’t want.

I’m bored with just putting the phone down on the callers.

I want to tie up their lines so that they don’t get the chance to call others and annoy them.

So here are a few of the fibs I have told to occupy their time so that they don’t have chance to call you…

 

Annoying the logmein scammers:

  • They call from PC support.  I say yes, I’ve been waiting for an engineer to arrive.  When are you going to get here?
  • They call from Microsoft support.  I engage them with a long conversation asking them which organisation or division they work for, whether they are full time employees, or vendors
  • They call from a Microsoft Partner to say I have a virus.  I tell them they have got through to the reception of a large company and ask them which department they want to be connected to.
  • Another call from a Microsoft support organisation.  I let them talk me through the options and then tell them that I can’t find the ‘Start’ button on my iPad
  • Another call.  I tell them I know a damn sight more than them about messages on the PC that tell where there is a problem and then go into Event viewer and start grilling them on the system messages
  • Yet another call.  These guys don’t give up do they?  This time I start talking about the Workstation and Server service which appear not to be working on this machine.

Callers from a call centre, far far away..

  • As the line clicks through, I say: Hello?  Hello?  Hello?  repeatedly for as long as it takes them to realise that I can’t hear them
  • I carry on having a normal conversation – as through I haven’t realise that the phone has connected

Cold calls

  • If it is a call telling me about a government initiative or discount, I grill them on which initiative or discount, and then spend time tapping the keyboard trying to find the initiative online
  • I tell the caller that I already know about the initiative as I work for the department that is organising the scheme
  • I ask for the name of the company calling and the company offering the discount and then spend time searching for the correct spelling of the company online
  • I tell the caller that I’d love to have new white UPVC windows / conservatory / porch, but I’m not sure how it works with a grade I listed building /court judgement / bankruptcy notices etc.

Surveys:

  • I answer yes to each question until they realise I’ve said yes all the way through the conversation
  • I tell them I’m of a completely different age range / home owner status / financial position to the truth

Photographic studio calls:

  • I was asked whether I wanted a cheap family portrait done.  I said I was single with no family.  He suggested that I had my photo taken with a pet.  I told him I had no pets apart from 2 chickens and I didn’t particularly didn’t fancy having my photo taken with either of them.

I could hear him laughing as he put down the phone…

So sometimes my way of getting rid of cold callers isn’t all that bad.  Perhaps I need to get an answering machine and free up some of my time.  Well what do you know, the phone is ringing again.  Which response shall I use today?…  Open-mouthed smile

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

Credit: TheGiantVermin

Technorati Tags: ,,

Candid camera captures attention in ‘Red Button’ square

Candid camera videos showing ordinary folks reacting to extraordinary events are some of the best videos on YouTube.  Have a look at this one from a Belgian TV company.

They put a big red button in the middle of an ordinary Flemish square, with a sign that read ‘push  here for drama’.  See what happens when the button is pushed.

 

It certainly captured the attention of the people in the square – and awareness of the brand certainly rose due to the video which has been viewed almost 30 million times.

Wouldn’t you like it if your brand name got the same amount of attention and shares?  You do not need to have the budget that this TV company has, a simple, hand held camera can achieve the same effect.

The talking dog tease video is testament to that.  All you need is a great idea, impact and something quirky to engage the audience.

…and a video camera too …

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

 

Flip your clothes using social marketplace Threadflip

I like the concept of Threadflip.  It is a social marketplace where you can sell your old clothes and accessories, and browse for fashion that suits your style.

Threadflip is:

‘is an exclusive and unique social marketplace designed to let you refresh your closet in a few easy steps. Sell the items you no longer wear, or share your own designs. Use your credit to shop the closets of your favorite designers, collectors, bloggers and friends or just cash out! Here’s a glimpse of what other fashionistas are flipping on Threadflip’

image

As a start up, Threadflip relies on investors, and has just secured a $1.3 million round of investment. It competes with other social shopping sites such as Poshmark, and eBay.

It is currently available to buyers and sellers in the US only, but has plans to increase its reach worldwide.

Users can sign in with Facebook, upload images of items that they would like to sell.  If the item is sold, the seller then ships the goods to buyers.Threadflip takes 15 per cent from the sale of each item.  if you have not time to do the selling yourself, Threadflip offers a white glove service.  They take care of the sale for you, and send you the cash from the sale.

You can state your fashion preferences and shoe size to ensure that all of the images you see are of items that you would like to buy.  You don’t need to search for the items, the items find you.The feed, which looks a lot like the Pinterest feed, shows who has liked the items, and comments for each item, and you have the opportunity to follow people who love, comment or purchase goods. ught,

One of the great advantages of social marketplaces is that buyers can share information about items that they intend to purchase, or have already bought.  The concept is like a collaborative swap meet, you sell and buy from people with same style as you.  Its a good idea – especially for female netizens who like to shop and share online.

Hopefully international commerce will be opened soon – I have my eyes on several items already Smile

 

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

Keeping your information away from Facebook apps

If you are concerned about Facebook using even more of your data to repopulate applications and friend information, then here is another setting that you need to change.

Hot on the heels of Facebook’s privacy policy alteration, is a new setting about apps.  Look at Home| Privacy settings |Apps games and websites| Edit settings.

Checked information is what other apps can see of your data.  See below:

image

If you don’t want other apps seeing so much information about you, then uncheck the boxes next to information you don’t want to share.  Are  you Sharing more than you thought on Facebook?  It might be worth your while checking around your privacy settings to make sure that you only share what you intend to share…

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

 

Technorati Tags: ,,,

You got me pregnant– so I’ll use social ads to find the father

Yikes.  There are some things that you would never put in the small ads.  This is a prime example of what NOT to communicate using social software.

image

Courtesy of Fuse, which reported the story, a woman went to a rock concert in Chicago, had sex with someone in a bathroom at the event and got pregnant.

The woman then posted an ad on Craigslist trying to find the father who seems fairly recognisable judging by the description below.  Here’s the full text of the ad as reported by Fuse (the ad is no longer visible)…

"Me: Blue hair, silver tube top, fishnets, Knee high black biker boots.
You: Red mohawk, black pentagram gauges, viper piercings.
I was grinding on you in the pit, then we went to the bathroom, and got f***ed up. You had a nice c**k and I was wasted so I let [you] raw dog it in the stall. You were really good and you had to gag me so I would make too much noise.
Anyway I’m pregnant. It’s yours. contact me if you want to be part of your child’s life."

Such a shame that she needed to turn to the small ads to find the person who impregnated her… Perhaps the power of Twitter, Facebook and the always on media, might find the person she is looking for..

A very sad and desperate cry for help…

 

Credit: janineomg

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.