Influencer Eileen Brown social media

How to become an Influencer

Influencer marketing is becoming increasingly popular, but not all influencers can be considered equal. In most cases celebrity influencers don’t have as much influence over your consumer decisions as you think. A new wave of influencers are equally important. Micro-influencers – like you and me, are just as likely to influence our peers as celebrities.

So how easy is it to become an influencer?  Here are my top tips for becoming recognised as a credible voice in your industry.

Be a consistent  influencer across platforms:.

Whether Facebook or YouTube, Twitter or Instagram, have a consistent voice. Influencers talk about the same topics, use the same hashtag, post similar pictures. You will start to become recognised for your knowledge in that topic. Whether it is icing cakes, fixing phones, or top-notch welding, the same message reinforces that you are the go-to person for that topic.

Use the same hashtags:

You will be able to use analytics tools to measure the success of a particular hashtag, or campaign across all platforms that you use if you use the same hashtag across Twitter, Facebook or Instagram for example.  You will then be able to get a fuller picture of your breadth reach as an influencer you see your hashtag propagate.

Focus on a few credible platforms.

Try to stick to two or three main channels to broadcast. People will tend to follow influencers across two or three platforms. If Instagram and YouTube are the channels of choice, then make sure you add quality content to them on a regular basis. Frantic bursts of activity followed by long periods of silence don’t tend to work well with media followers.

Influencers use followers and fans to deliver their message for them:

92 percent of people trust word of mouth recommendations  so make sure that your existing followers get fabulous content that they would be happy to propagate further to their network.

Be  an authentic influencer:

Authenticity is a really important part of the news we want to receive from our influencer connections. Facebook has recognised this for a long time, and has honed its algorithm to make sure that you get the news that is most relevant to  what you want to see in your life.

Avoid the single point of failure:

Try not to rely on one channel to get the word out. Google stopped focusing on Hangouts, Facebook has throttled organic reach for brands, and there is no longer any guarantee what your fans will see. Try to spread your message across different channels, so that if your message fails to deliver on one site, then it might get through on another

Get your followers to a place that you own.

Point people to your own blog, your own newsletter, encourage signups on your own site. Then if your chosen site disappears, restricts visibility of your posts or goes behind a paywall, then you have a list of loyal followers that you can move to another platform.

Keep at it. over time, your fans will come. If they like what they see, they will stay…

Tsu groups: Why your beta tsuGroup is not getting authorised

Lots of people who engage on Tsu have been asking why their particular group has not been approved for the beta testing phase of tsugroups.

Eileen Brown social Media consultancy Amastra Tsu groups

 I talked to the Tsu team about the new Groups feature and how tsuGroups groups will work. I have two Tsu groups in the beta test: Tech and Social Media Trends. It will be interesting seeing how these groups evolve.

To join Tsu – the social media network that pays users to post, you need to use another user’s link to join – such as https://www.tsu.co/eileenb. From there you will become part of the user’s family tree and be able to build your own network from there.

Here are the definitive answers to the questions I got to #askSebastian for my article on tsu.

  • If the group owner has a ‘low quality’ page with few posts or interaction the group will not get approved for the beta. For the time of the beta tsu wants groups that have owners that are really active on tsu already.
  • Every group in the beta MUST have an admin name in the application. Furthermore, the admin MUST have accepted the invitation to be an admin of the group. Groups without admin names WILL NOT be considered for the beta.
  • Groups will NOT be permitted if the group name contains the word tsu in the name (It might be mistaken for an ‘official’ account and might have incorrect information). The terms of service for #tsugroups says this really clearly.
  • Groups offering tips, rules, hints on how to use tsu will not be allowed at beta stage (they might also have incorrect information and might mislead readers). It MIGHT be ok to run groups like this AFTER the beta ends – I do not know this for certain.
  • Tsu has over 3000 groups in the queue — it is rolling out groups really slowly — a few per day — to watch the spam levels and how users react to the different views of groups (timelines sometimes, images other times).
  • Its a beta test — EXPECT change.
  • Remember – this is still a beta test. Tsu is working out how best to optimise the platform so that when groups are fully live, then everyone will have a great experience.
    If you have been wondering why your group has not been approved yet, check that the group has a nominated charity and that the admin has accepted your invitation to administer the group. Tsu doesn’t have the resources right now to chase everyone to provide this information. Hopefully the community on Tsu can let everyone know 🙂

Is blogging still relevant?

Blogging is old hat and no longer needed as a separate entity. There, I’ve said it. After blogging for 11 years, I have had an about face and decided that blogging for blogging’s sake is irrelevant.cms-265133_1280 pixelcreatures Eileen Brown Amastra

But am I right?

Blogging has been around for the whole of the 21st century.

First coined as a term “weblog” in 1997, blogging exploded in 1999 with the launch of blogging tools such as LiveJournal and Blogger which made it easy to put your thoughts down online.

Writers live-blogged events long before instantaneous tools like Twitter and Weibo were thought of. Writing down your every thought became the de-facto “thing” for bloggers to do.

I started blogging in 2004 – fairly early on in the big scheme of things blogging-wise. Back then it was the only way to be able to communicate with an audience. We were hidebound with simple newsletters, fairly poor web pages and had little opportunity to interact with our online writers or customers.

Over the last 11 years there has been a plethora of tools that enable us to express ourselves online. YouTube (2005) allowed comments, shares and uploads of visual vignettes. Facebook initially allowed us to write on another’s wall, poke each other, and post snippets of our lives.

Self hosted WordPress sites have been around since 2003. These allow all traffic to be directed to your website and blog. Blogging was an easy way to gain clicks and eyeballs of your content

Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, MySpace, Google+ and now Tsu, the new kid on the block all allow us to express our thoughts. Even LinkedIn encourages posting directly onto its platform. We are no longer hidebound to short status updates (even Twitter has apps that enable you to tweet longer updates – or send direct messages that have no character limit.

All are discoverable by a web search. Even your public posts on Facebook can appear at the top of search results if you know the correct keywords to use.  Google+ has long indexed posts and Tsu has recently opened its doors so that its content is fully searchable.

So, with all of the opportunities to talk about what you want to, spread across numerous platforms, is blogging really necessary?  This post will propagate across four different sites – to get an audience that might find me by different means.

But will a carefully crafted bunch of content ever beat a quick post with a link to a funny video or “you’ll never guess what happened next – I was shocked” clickbait article?

Has blogging had its day? Will it be lost amongst all of the other instantaneous pieces of hurriedly curated links and status updates populating everywhere online? Or will our thoughts and musings be appreciated, discovered and relished years and years down the line as the genre evolves into something completely different…

Death of my blog?

I really intended to stop blogging on my hosted WordPress blog. I had planned to call this blog “the last post” or “Bye,Bye blog” – something whimsical perhaps, something that meant a lot to me. I had spent sometime reviewing the variety of topics I had talked about over the last ten years.

Looking back and learning will enable you to move forward eileenb Amastra Eileen Brown motivational quote

I have a new blogging site using self-hosted WordPress on http://amastra.com/blog My last few WordPress posts were geared up to moving my regular readers to my new location.

I included links to my new blog location and I intended to – well – just leaving the past behind as I stopped posting on my old post. I’d even planned what I would write.

I would do a retrospective post. I would touch on the highlights of the last ten years and muse on how things have changed in social publishing and engagement since I started blogging back in 2004.

But when it came to it, I just could not do it. Over the past ten years I’ve posted over 2000 articles. Most are not relevant any more. Software has been updated, opinions have changed, my job has morphed into something totally different more than once, and technology has moved on dramatically. In some ways a lot of this blog is now obsolete.

But not for me.

This is a record of the last ten years of my life, the trips I went on, the experiences I had. It really is a trip down memory lane for me. Even though I migrated the posts over to the Amastra web site and blog, I can’t leave this old blog to  site and away and die.

Blogging has been a big part of my career journey – and what an amazing journey it has been. It has not all been good. The bad bits have given me some great life lessons, and some of it has been painful, some parts have been boring and some has been filled with anxiety.

But its still my journey. And I can’t let it go.

So to compromise, I’m going to post to https://eileenbrown.wordpress.com occasionally.The Amastra blog will now be my main blogging platform whereas my hosted WordPress blog will be updated from time to time. Hopefully these posts will never go stale, become out of date, or slip away and disappear. They will continue to be my link to my past.

Am I holding on to an out-dated blog out of some misplaced sentimentality?.  Am I doing this just to preserve a record of my longevity in this fast moving social interactive world? Am I reluctant to embrace the new and leave behind the old? All of them are probably true.

But killing this old blog off permanently is a step too far for me. I’ll be leaving my digital footprint here for a while longer I think – until it is really time to leave my musings and experiences to decay in the ethereal reaches of the digital void…

How to create YouTube slideshow videos from your images

*** Please update your feeds from https://eileenbrown.wordpress.com to http://amastra.com/blog/ ***

You do not need to capture videos to upload onto YouTube. You can make great videos using YouTube’s slideshow tool. It is really easy to do too.

The YouTube upload button gives you four options: Capture a video with your webcam, create a photo slideshow, broadcast a Google+ Hangout, or edit a video.

  Eileen Brown Amastra

After uploading the images you have the option to rearrange them into a logical flow or story .

Eileen Brown YouTube slideshow Amastra

You can then add appropriate music to go with your video slideshow, select how long you want each slide to display, which transition you would like and whether you want to pan across the images and zoom.

How to create YouTube slideshow videos from your images Amastra Eileen Brown

Click upload, give your slideshow a title and description – and voila! You can see the finished result of uploading my images on the Amastra at Whistler slideshow on my YouTube channel.

Eileen Brown is a social media strategist and consultant at Amastra, a columnist at ZDNet and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Connect with Eileen on Twitter and or contact her to find out how she can elevate your brand and help your business become more social.