Tag Archives: Engagement Framework

Reasons to implement your Engagement strategy

Does your online strategy show how much you care about your customers?  Do you engage regularly with your audience, giving them value from your interactions with them? In this connected world, can you afford not to communicate with your customers?  Do you know what your ROI on your social activities is?  Do you even measure your ROI?

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There are some staggering numbers of people online these days, and there’s also an expectation that brands will have good workable social strategies.  Take a look at these facts:

  • Over 2 billion people online are now.  There are only 7 billion people in the world.  Lots of them are still too young to read.  You can engage with 28.5% of the entire population of the world 
  • There are 1 billion accounts on Facebook.  If you have a Facebook page, potentially huge numbers of your fans can see it.  Starbucks has 30 million fans, Coca Cola has 41 million fans and lady Gaga has 50 million fans.
  • 85% of customers expect that businesses should be active in social media.  Where is your social brand?
  • Business is built on relationships.  Are you passionate about your customers>  Does your online engagement and social activity demonstrate how much you care about your customers? Customers believe that 80% of brands are not passionate about their customers
  • Do you blog?  If you do, you’ll get about 55% more visitors to your web site ad 67% more leads than if you don’t blog.  Demonstrate your credibility.  Blog regularly, be credible.  Keep up the conversation. Put blogging at the heart of your content marketing strategy
  • 77% of customers will read status updates from the brand.  They probably wont comment – but at least they are listening to you.
  • 17% of your fans will comment on your messaging.  Perhaps they will share your story amongst their friends.  That is if you are communicating with them in the first instance.
  • 51% of Facebook fans say that they are likely to buy from you if you have a Facebook page.
  • 68% of subscribers to your email newsletter are likely to buy your services.  You need to have a strong call to action to encourage them to purchase
  • Brands don’t always have a good listening strategy.  30% of customer questions and feedback do not get replied to. 
  • On Twitter the listening strategy is poor.  over 71% of complaints on Twitter are not responded to.  implement a listening framework across channels and respond to feedback, good and bad.
  • 43% of social media users talk to brands, but brands don’t listen to their social customers

Further information and facts can be found in the infographic from BitRebels.  Avoid this at your peril.  Engage or be left behind commercially.  You need to have an engagement strategy and make it work with your audience and customers.

 

Eileen is a social business strategist, ZDNet columnist and author of Working The Crowd: Social Media Marketing for Business. Contact her to find out how she can help your business extend its reach.

Credit: Keoni Cabral

 

Creating your Engagement framework

I’ve been talking to a client today about engagement. They want to connect with customers – and they also want to define a structured way of dealing with objection handling, positive comments and criticism.  They’re trying to re-invent the wheel and are spending a lot of hours doing so.

The great thing about social media is that by its very nature, frameworks are created and shared as a positive example of best practice sharing.  Here’s something I’ve found on David’s blog which is how the US Air Force responds to web postings (see original version on wikipedia and the amended V2 larger version here):

Air_force_web_posting_response_assessment_v2

If you hate graphics and prefer bullet points to work through, here’s my version from social media workshops I run which includes some different considerations.

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With either framework, you should aim to come up with a flow chart of your own, pertaining to your specific business and your product / service / support requirements.  Not every framework should be identical but adjusted and amended to fit your business. Putting this into a flow chart, and training your team so that they know which response to use in each situation will prove invaluable if a customer rants about your product on his blog / website / twitter  stream etc.  Having structure in place, will enable the team to effectively showcase successes, deal with negative perception and quell issues before they arise.

Where’s your framework? Smile